Snakes

Massasauga - Sistrurus catenatus (Venomous)

Massasauga - Sistrurus catenatus (Venomous)

This is a small rattlesnake that measures 17 - 39 and 1/2 inches in length. It is VENOMOUS! There is a row of black or dark brown middorsal blotches on a lighter brown or gray background. There are two or three rows of small spots on the sides. All blotches and spots may be outlined in white. The blotches usually turn into bars on the tail; the last bar being a complete ring. Read More at herpnet.net

Timber Rattlesnake - Crotalus horridus (Venomous)

Timber Rattlesnake - Crotalus horridus (Venomous)

This is a large, venomous Minnesota species that is very heavy bodied and measures from 36 to 60 inches in length; the record is 74 1/2 inches (Conant and Collins, 1991). Timber rattlesnakes have a diamond shaped head which is set off from their relatively thin neck. The pupils of the eyes are elliptical in bright light and there is a heat-sensitive pit between the eye and nostral on both sides of the head. Read More at herpnet.net

Timber Rattlesnake - Crotalus horridus (Venomous)

Lined Snake - Tropidoclonion lineatum

This snake resembles a small, colorless garter snake. It is 8-10 inches long and is nonvenomous. There is little variation in this species so identification is easy. There is a light (almost always white; rarely yellow) mid dorsal stripe. There is also a light lateral stripe on each side of the snake. Ground color is gray or brown and there are some dark dots between the dorsal and lateral stripes. The belly is plain white with two rows of bold black half moons down the center. Sometimes there is a yellowish stripe over the moons, but they still retain their boldness. Read More at herpnet.net

Timber Rattlesnake - Crotalus horridus (Venomous)

Eastern Garter Snake - Thamnophis sirtalis

The eastern garter snake is a medium sized Minnesota snake measuring 14 to 48 inches in length. It is non-venomous and some specimens can be less docile than the plains garter snake. The ground color is light brown to black with two alternating rows of black spots. Some specimens have a lighter background color in which the spots stand out especially well. There are three longitudinal stripes. The dorsal stripe is usually yellow. Read More at herpnet.net

Timber Rattlesnake - Crotalus horridus (Venomous)

Plains Garter Snake - Thamnophis radix

The plains garter snake is a medium sized Minnesota snake measuring 14 to 43 inches in length. It is non-venomous and can be more docile than the common garter snake. The ground color is light brown to black with two alternating rows of black spots. Some specimens have an olive green background color in which the spots stand out especially well. There are three longitudinal stripes. Read More at herpnet.net

Timber Rattlesnake - Crotalus horridus (Venomous)

Redbelly Snake - Storeria occipitomaculata

This is Minnesota's smallest species of snake measuring 7-10 inches long (Conant and Collins, 1991). It is nonvenomous. Generally speaking, there are two color phases of this snake and even these are subject to variation. The first is dark brown to light tan dorsally with a single light mid dorsal stripe. Read More at herpnet.net

Timber Rattlesnake - Crotalus horridus (Venomous)

Brown Snake - Storeria dekayi

This is a small Minnesota species measuring 13-18 inches long (Conant and Collins, 1991). It is nonvenomous. The ground color on the back is a varying shade of brown. There is a light stripe that runs down the back. A row of black spots borders the stripe on both sides. The head is sometimes unmarked, but it usually has at least one (if not all) of the following: an inverted black V under the eye that stops at the mouth line, a large, black semi-ring on the side of the nape sometimes extending onto the belly scales. Read More at herpnet.net

Timber Rattlesnake - Crotalus horridus (Venomous)

Gopher Snake (Bullsnake) - Pituophis catenifer

The bullsnake is largest species of snake in Minnesota. This snake ranges from 37 to 72 inches in length with the record being 100 inches (Conant and Collins 1991). Their ground color varies from straw yellow over the entire body to white on the neck and fore part of body, dull yellow on the body, and a cleaner, brighter yellow on the tail. Bullsnakes have over 40 large, dark body blotches on the body alone. Read More at herpnet.net

Timber Rattlesnake - Crotalus horridus (Venomous)

Western Fox Snake - Pantherophis vulpinus

Measuring 36 to 56 inches in length, this is one of Minnesota's larger nonvenomous species of snake (Conant and Collins, 1991). Ground color ranges from a dark straw yellow to a dark brown. Occasionally, there may be orange, yellow, or reddish pigment between the scales. There are large distinct body blotches that are very dark brown or black. These blotches become rings on the tail. Read More at herpnet.net

Timber Rattlesnake - Crotalus horridus (Venomous)

Rat Snake - Pantherophis obsoletus

Rat snakes are among the largest of Minnesota's snakes. Adults range from 40 to 74
inches in length. The record is 101 inches (Conant and Collins, 1991). It is non venomous and,
as its name implies, is generally a black snake, although very few specimens are completely
pitch black. Most adults have shiny, unmarked black heads and necks with bright white labials. Read More at herpnet.net

Timber Rattlesnake - Crotalus horridus (Venomous)

Smooth Green Snake - Opheodrys vernalis

This snake is not likely to be confused with any other snake in Minnesota. It is 12-22 inches in length and non venomous. It has no outstanding markings, but it is a bright, brilliant green. The belly is usually bright yellow, but sometimes may be cream instead. The labials are the color of the belly. The scales are smooth (hence the name) and the anal plate is divided. Read More at herpnet.net

Timber Rattlesnake - Crotalus horridus (Venomous)

Northern Water Snake - Nerodia sipedon

Northern water snakes are one of the larger medium-sized Minnesota snakes. They range in length from 24 to 55 inches and may be quite heavy bodied as adults. There are so many pattern and color variations in certain populations, and in individual northern water snakes, that to list them all is not feasible for the length of this account. Generally, they have light brown or reddish markings on a brown or grayish ground color. Read More at herpnet.net

Timber Rattlesnake - Crotalus horridus (Venomous)

Milk Snake - Lampropeltis triangulum

A medium sized Minnesota snake that is 24 to 52 inches in length, but quite often maintains a slender build. It is nonvenomous. Although this snake's blotched pattern remains consistent, its general coloration is quite variable. Some specimens can be beautifully light colored, having a light gray or brown ground color and bright to rusty red body blotches. Others can look a lot like fox snakes, Elaphe vulpina, having a general brown coloration. Read More at herpnet.net

Timber Rattlesnake - Crotalus horridus (Venomous)

Eastern Hognose Snake - Heterodon platirhinos

This is a medium to large Minnesota snake that may be 24 to 46 inches long and has a very stout body. It is not considered venomous. Spotted specimens have a brown or yellow ground color with darker brown or black spots. These alternate with smaller dark spots on the sides. The blotches may turn into rings on the tail. There may be red or orange pigment in the skin between the scales, and this pigment may occasionally infringe upon the scales themselves. Read More at herpnet.net

Timber Rattlesnake - Crotalus horridus (Venomous)

Western Hognose Snake - Heterodon nasicus

This is a medium sized Minnesota snake ranging from 15 to 39 inches in length. It is a very heavy-bodied serpent. It is considered nonvenomous. Its ground color is usually some shade of brown with darker brown blotches down the back. There are two alternating rows of smaller dark spots along the sides. There is a large longitudinal blotch on both sides of the neck. Read More at herpnet.net

Timber Rattlesnake - Crotalus horridus (Venomous)

Ringneck Snake - Diadophis punctatus

This is a small Minnesota species that ranges from 10 - 15 inches in length (Conant and Collins, 1991). It is plain brownish, black, bluish black, or slate colored above. There are no dorsal or head markings. There is usually a yellow or orange ring around the neck. The belly is yellow or orange and may or may not have spots (see subspecies). Read More at herpnet.net

Timber Rattlesnake - Crotalus horridus (Venomous)

Racer - Coluber constrictor

This is a large Minnesota species measuring between 23 and 50 inches in length (Conant and Collins, 1991). Adults are uniformly blue, bluish black, greenish, or light brown. There are no head or dorsal markings. The undersurface is dirty white, porcelain, or yellow with no markings. The throat and neck are bright yellow and the chin and upper labials may be yellow or white. Read More at herpnet.net